© Gainor E. Roberts 2014 All the works of art shown in the website are protected by the Copyright Laws of the United States of America and may only be used by permission of the artist.

THE ARTWORK OF GAINOR E. ROBERTS

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ABOUT  NON-OBJECTIVE

Obviously I am not an abstract artist. I never could shake my realism roots, but I am also wild about music and have been since early childhood. I wanted to  picture some musical ideas and could only think of them as non-objective images. There are three completed paintings (as of Summer 2013) in the Music Series, and two more to go; Nocturne and Tone Poem, both of which have been occupying a large chunk of brain space for quite awhile now.

I have used acrylic paint for these paintings, and it is probably suitable for this type of painting, but I have to admit that I still don’t like it very much. Anyway, I can let my imagination fly, but I am still not very spontaneous even when it comes to this type of painting, and it has been quite well planned out in advance. The design for Theme and Variations was worked out many years ago on a small paper in colored pencil before I finally put it onto canvas.

Will there be any more non-objective paintings? Probably not. I find my enthusiasm for this type of work is just not there, and other things keep pushing first and the Music Paintings go on the back burner. But stay tuned, I have a wild and zany idea for Nocturne that I’m panting to try out.

I am often asked by my friends about abstract and non-objective paintings. They say “What’s it all about?” It is so hard to talk to someone who thinks that it might be child’s play to do abstract paintings. It is not easy, and the best of them are very carefully composed and planned out. But Modern Art is difficult to understand, even for an art lover like myself, and so much of it is simply awful. An excellent video about “Why is Modern Art So Bad” is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNI07egoefc

Robert Florczak explains: “For two millennia, great artists set the standard for beauty. Now those standards are gone. Modern Art is a competition between the ugly and the twisted; the most shocking wins. What happened? How did the beautiful come to be reviled and bad taste come to be celebrated?  



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